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Jeroen en Maggie Boersma uit Amsterdam hebben een speciale band met de Amerikaanse highways en de neon reclame borden die je daar ziet. In 2008 waren ze in Albuquerque aan de Central Avenue, onderdeel van Route66, en ze waren op slag verkocht.
Ze begonnen foto's te maken van de highways en de borden omdat ze zagen dat er weinig of geen onderhoud aan gedaan werd en ze wilden ze vastleggen voordat ze voorgoed verdwenen waren.
Nu maken ze 2 of 3 reizen per jaar naar de US. Tijdens die reizen fotograferen zie highways en de neon reclames en beschrijven nauwkeurig waar ze te vinden zijn. Ter voorbereiding van de reizen zijn ze soms al een jaar van tevoren bezig met o.a. sateliet beelden.
We hopen dat jullie genieten van de hier getoonde foto's die gemaakt zijn voor de collectie van 'Legends Of America.'
kijk ook eens hier:
http://photos.legendsofamerica.com/boersmasigns

Via die website zijn er ook prints van de foto's te koop!

Jeroen and Maggie Boersma, from Amsterdam, The Netherlands, have a special love of highways and signs in the United States. On a trip to New Mexico in 2008, the couple experienced Albuquerque's Central Avenue, also known as Route 66, and have been hooked ever since.
They began capturing highways and signs as they noticed the lack of upkeep on many of them and wanted to document the icons before they disappeared, especially along America's Mother Road, Route 66.
Now they make two to three trips a year to the United States, each time writing turn by turn driving directions from sign to sign within the towns they visit, and studying for each trip up to a full year ahead of time, using satellite views of old highway alignments in preparation.
We hope you enjoy just some of their incredible work in this special collection for Legends Of America."
See also:
http://photos.legendsofamerica.com/boersmasigns

On this website you can also order prints of the pictures!

Santa Monica, California.


The original Tinder Box store, also known as Ed's Pipe Shop, was established in 1928.

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La Verne, California.


Fairplex Liquor still sports the old Lopez Liquor Sign from the 1940's.

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Tucson, Arizona.


The Riviera Motor Lodge's sign was commissioned in 1952 by motel owners Mr. and Mrs. Walczak and Mr. and Mrs. Pearson. Supported by a massive steel post, it originally rose from a brick plinth in a small reflecting pool. It was later moved closer to the buildings.

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Tucson, Arizona.


Kon Tiki, one of the last remaining operational tiki temples from American's mid century tiki past, opened its doors and began welcoming patrons to Paradise in 1963. Telling visitors to "Experience Paradise, Tucson Style" this restaurant and lounge is the brain child of original owner Dean Short, who opened up several restaurants in Tucson beginning in the 1940's.
Wanting to capitalize on America's increasing fascination at the time with exotic cultures, Short created a tropical oasis in the middle of the desert with Kon Tiki. Today, the interior is almost completely original from the opening day, including the largest collection of Milan Guanko tikis in the world.
The restaurant has hosted several stars over the years, including Clint Eastwood, Robert Mitchum, Lee Marvin and Robert Wagner.
Today, Kon Tiki is owned by Paul Christopher, who started as a busboy there at the age of 15. In 2010, the gas powered tiki torches on top of the sign were restored.

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US highway 84, Tucson, Arizona.


The Sunland Motel, started in 1949, sits on the Miracle Mile (Casa Grande Highway). The sign, among a dense concentration of vintage neon signs, still lights the way for visitors to this well preserved 20th Century Revival single story motel, constructed in a simplified Spanish Revival style.

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US highway 80, Tucson, Arizona.


The Owl Lodge sits on Benson Highway and is no longer a "motel", but still houses people as apartments.

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Tucson, Arizona.


The Canyon State Motor Lodge Neon sign was originally on Casa Grande Highway, Tucson's Miracle Mile. Constructed in 1951, and renamed the Arizonan Motel in the 1970's, the sign was taken down in 2010, but saved by the Tucson Historical Preservation Foundation, then restored in 2011 and put up on the downtown campus of Pima Community College, featuring both the 1951 and 1970's design configurations.

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US highway 80, Tucson, Arizona.


The Frontier Motel originally opened in 1941 with this historic neon sign added in 1943. The sign still stands and to this day illuminates at night in front of the intact property, which remains as a fine example of early highway motor courts.neon photograph *The Frontier was built in a 20th Century Revival style with a 1965 addition at the rear. Ornamentation includes exposed red brick, carved wooden columns, and red concrete floors. This property has remained intact and is a fine example of an early highway motor court. The original neon sign illuminates at night.

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Tucson, Arizona.


Originally in front of the Magic Carpet Miniature Golf Course on East Speedway in Tucson, the sign was commissioned in 1971 by Lee Koplin. It started with chasing and flashing incandescent light bulbs, but was reconfigured with blinking neon.
Chapman Automotive purchased the property for redevelopment, and in 2009 donated the sign to the Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation. It was restored in 2012 by Addisigns, its original fabricator.

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US highway 80, Tucson, Arizona.


Although the store is long gone, the neon sign for Flash TV still stands on 6th Street
Flash TV started business in 1945.

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Globe, Arizona.


The Tonto Hotel, later called the Murphy Hotel, built in 1916, still sports its neon vintage sign proclaiming "New". The hotel has been closed since the 1970's.

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Casa Grande, Arizona.


Built in 1949, the Se-Tay Motel still welcomes visitors with its vintage neon sign. neon photograph

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US highway 80, Yuma, Arizona.
The Yuma Cabana has been in business since the 1950's.
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US highway 80, Tucson, Arizona.


Built as the Willard Hotel in the early 1900's, in 1948 the property was renamed the Pueblo Hotel and Apartments. The sign went through various stages, with the swimming pool text and diver added in the 1950's. This vintage icon of a sign in Tucson was restored in 2012.

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US highway 60, Phoenix, Arizona.
Operating from 1966 through 2004, Mr. Lucky's Night Club in Phoenix was Arizona's first gambling casino, then reverted to a night club with Country music upstairs and Rock N' Roll in the basement after the state rejected gambling.
Many big acts played Mr. Lucky's over the years, including Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Marty Robbins, Dierks Bentley, Kenny Chesney and many others. Although no longer in business, the sign still stands testament to a better day.. neon photograph
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US highway 80, Mesa, Arizona.


Starting as Dick Frank's Indian Trading Post in 1925, the sign for the Kiva Lodge still stands since the 1940's, though is in danger of becoming a thing of the past. Its broken neon tubing no longer light up the night.

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1936:

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US highway 89, Cottonwood, Arizona.


The neon welcome sign to the small town of Cottonwood has been greeting visitors since the 1960's.

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US highway 80, Gila Bend, Arizona.


No longer a hotel, The Stout's Hotel in Gila Bend first opened in 1927 and was described at the time as the "Jewel of the Desert" because of its features of abalone shell and coral in the flooring, and portions of the walls. It closed in the mid 1980's after railroad pulled out of the area.

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US highway 60, Globe, Arizona.
The Villa Motel has been gone for quite some time but the sign has been surviving since the 1950's
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Casa Grande, Arizona.


Built in 1945, the Boots & Saddle Motel is still welcoming visitors to Casa Grande.

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Mesa, Arizona.


Built in 1959, the El Capitan Lodge still has room for you.

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US highway 93, 95 and 466, Las Vegas, Nevada.


The Sky Ranch Motel was built in 1954 on Fremont Street, where Las Vegas was born.

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Tucson, Arizona.


Here's a factoid from the laundromat industry: What's known as "Norge Balls" were developed by a national chain of laundromats called Norge Village Cleaners based out of Chicago in the early 1960's. The Plastic, polka-dotted ball signs remind many of Wonder Bread wrappers, and revolved on poles or roofs with lighting inside. This one in Tucson, Arizona still stands at Dean's Village Cleaners, which opened in 1961.

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Yuma, Arizona.


The 8th Street Drive-In Liquor sports a cool neon sign.

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Albuquerque, New Mexico.

The Rupert Plumbing sign was built in the early 1950s by the Zeon Sign Company. The wrench is approximately 15 feet tall. In 2001, the company moved to another location and left this sign behind. Due to zoning restrictions, the sign could not be installed at their new building. The sign was maintained and lit until their move. The text alternated between red, green and yellow neon while the wrench was blue.

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US highway 89, Hatch, Utah.


The Bryce Canyon Inn appeared to be closed, but still sports its 1960's vintage neon sign.

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Las Vegas, Nevada.


Opened in 1967, The Peter Pan Motel closed briefly in 2006, but reopened with this newly repaired neon sign.

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US highway 80, Mesa, Arizona.


The Sun Land Motel was built in the early 1960's and still going strong.
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Yuma, Arizona.


The Del Sol Night Club sign originally belonged to the Del Sol Hotel on 200 East 3rd Street.
Built in 1927, this hotel has had a long history. It was in use untill the late 1980's when it was closed for future renovations. Sadly city funding for the restoration has been unavailable. In the 1990's this building was used in the crime chase movie "The Getaway" starring Alec Baldwin and Kim Basinger. It fell into disrepair and has been closed for the last 15 years, ocupide only by squaters and pigeons. In October of 2008 the city of Yuma was approached my indi film company Rampant Entertainment. A deal is on the table for a film project called "RENOVATION" a horror/thriller set in the hotel. Shooting of the film is tentatively scheduled for September of 2009 and the film makers have agreed to donate a portion of profits on the films theatrical performance to the real life rnovation project. Though damaged by vagrants and weather, the over all structure is sound and the city is estimating the restoration to cast in the $4,000,000 range. The property has been made available for sale many times but the city has refused those tabled arguing that the building should be used to better the city and draw more business to the downtown area.
Purchased and kept in perfect condition by the Mine Shaft Bar on 3905 South 4th Avenue also in Yuma.

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Mount Carmel, Utah.


A 1931 eatery in Utah, the Thunderbird sports a vintage neon sign that didn't have enough room for spelling out "home" and instead says "Ho-Made Pies".

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US highway 80, Mesa, Arizona.


In 1958, brothers Elmo and Richard Kaesler migrated from Syracuse, KS to Mesa, AZ and opened the Starlite Motel. To attract motorists to stay at the Starlite, they built a pool. Two years later, they wisely chose to tell the world about it with an iconic sign. Artist Stanley Russon designed a neon sign with a bathing beauty diving towards the ground, and Paul Millet fabricated the 78-ft.-tall spectacular.
Over half a century, it’s estimated that, having plunged six times per minute, the lady made more than six million dives. Her plummets ended on October 5, 2010, when a ferocious hailstorm blew through and decimated the sign. The tubing was destroyed, and numerous metal pieces were twisted and hurled to the ground.
Thankfully, the Mesa Preservation Foundation appreciated the Starlite’s Diving Lady (the motel remains in operation) and worked diligently to raise the $120,000 required to restore her to glory.

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Coolidge, Arizona.


The Gallopin' Goose Saloon and Grill was established in 1935. Country legend Waylon Jennings played here while he was a disc jockey at KCKY in Coolidge back in the late 1950's.

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US highways 93, 95 and 466, Las Vegas, Nevada.


The Safari Motel sign on Fremont Street is from the early 1950's.

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Las Vegas, Nevada.

A 1950s-era Santa Fe Railway sign from San Diego now shines in Las Vegas.
Bought, restored and put back up by the Las Vegas Neon Museum in the Fremont Street Experience area.

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US highway 80, Mesa, Arizona.


Watson's Flowers, family owned and operated since 1927.

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US highways 93, 95 and 466, Las Vegas, Nevada.


The Chief Court Hotel sign was originally installed around 1940 at the hotel formerly located at 1201 E. Fremont Street. The hotel architect was A. Lacey Worswick. The sign was loaned and refurbished by the Tiberti Family.
It was installed as part of the Neon Museum on July 8, 1997. The sign can now be found on the northeast corner of Fremont Street Experience and 4th Street.

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San Francisco, California.


John Murio's Bar & Trophy Room on famous Haight Street since 1959.

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US highway 91, Las Vegas, Nevada.


5th Street Liquor was long-time downtown establishment on Las Vegas Boulevard.
The sign dates circa 1946 and operated until the store closed in 1988. It was restored by The Neon Museum and installed as part of Neonopolis in 2002.

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Santa Cruz, California.


The Rio Theatre from 1949.

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US highway 91, Las Vegas, Nevada.


The first sign to be put on display on Fremont Street. The Hacienda Horse and Rider was originally installed in 1967 at the Hacienda Hotel, formerly located at 3950 Las Vegas Boulevard South.
It was restored through a generous donation from Brad Friedmutter. It can now be found at the intersection of Fremont Street Experience and Las Vegas Boulevard.

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US highway 80, Mesa, Arizona.

This Circle RB Guest Motel Lodge and RV Park, a vintage Mexican-style low-rise motel building in Mesa, Arizona, was built in 1948. It reportedly was named after the original owner's initials of "R" and "B. " A portion of the motel building can be seen in the background here.

The motel's wonderfully kitschy neon sign topper features a smiling cowboy with a lasso and was likely created in the late 1940s to early 1950s. The sign was refurbished in 2006 by the motel's latest owner.

In the 1950s and 1960s, Main Street in Mesa, Arizona had a tourist and population explosion that lasted several decades. Fast forward to today, and many of the old motels, hotels, and businesses, with their gloriously gaudy neon signage, have been demolished and carted away. Some remnants of that bygone era still remain. While their futures are uncertain, historic groups are working diligently to save what remains of Mesa's mid-century history.

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US highway 95, Tonopah, Nevada.


Situated next to Tonopah's first graveyard where 30 miners are buried that either died of an underground fire, or the plague, the Clown Motel is alleged to be haunted. Or, they could be just clowning around.

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US highway 95, Mina, Nevada.


Mina used to be hopping back in the days of the railroad and mining.
With both now gone, only 115 people are left.
All that's left is this closed Sue's Motel with the fantastic sign and the Mina Club bar.

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Los Angeles, California.


Established in 1952, Melody Bar & Grill in Los Angeles was a prominent steak house through the early 1980's, then a sports bar known for being a hangout for the Lakers Basketball and King hockey players through the 90's. New owners have spent time and effort into keeping its nostalgic feel of the original establishment, with food and entertainment included, as they are the closest bar to Los Angeles International Airport.

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Amarillo, Texas.


The Cowboy Motel is from the 1950's.

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Route 66, Amarillo, Texas.


The Big Texan opened in 1960 and was originally on Route 66 until the restaurant moved to a spot along the new interstate in the 1970's.

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Route 66, Tucumcari, New Mexico.


The Palomino Motel opened in 1953.

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Route 66, Tucumcari, New Mexico.


The Westerner Drive Inn opened in 1949.
It went out of business around 2000.
An abandoned sign and building are left behind.

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Route 66, Grants, New Mexico.


The Grants Cafe, since 1938.

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US highways 60 and 395, Riverside, California.


Built in 1960, the Historic Thunderbird Lodge was part of the original hotel franchise.

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West Hollywood, California.


This 1940's era Schwinn sign still stands in front of what is now Safety Cycle.

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US highways 80 and 89, Tucson, Arizona.


An icon in Tucson, the sign in front of the Tucson Inn has been featured in countless promotional materials and has even inspired the logo of an international entertainment company. From 1953.

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Route 66, Newberry Springs, California.


The Henning Motel sign speaks of a better day on Route 66.

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Bakersfield, California.


Nita's Silver Fox Tavern put up their animated neon sign in 1957. The sign was refurbished in 2009, but the Silver Fox closed the next year. Today the sign is in the Kern County Museum garden.

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Bakersfield, California.


The Jolly Kone Drive-In is still serving up goodness, complete with its 1950's era neon.

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Route 66, Victorville, California.


Desert Motors sports some pretty cool neon.

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Route 66, Barstow, California.


We understand that, once upon a time, the Village Hotel had some pretty good Chinese Food. The vintage 50's Neon still stands for travelers.

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Garden Grove, California.


Established in 1955, Bear Alignment & Brake was all over southern California at one point, but this one is one of the few that remain, now Vodie's Wheel Alignment. Glad they left their fun neon.

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Chandler, Arizona.


A fun and funky liquor store sign from the 1950's.

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US highway 80, Tucson, Arizona.


Still standing, the original neon commissioned in 1940 for the La Siesta Motel.

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Route 66, Monrovia, California.


Designated a National Historic Landmark and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.
The Aztec Hotel closed for renovations in 2012 and as of this writing was still closed. Built in 1924, the hotel is one of the most unique structures on the Mother Road in California.

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Route 66, Yucca, Arizona.


The motel sign still stands at the old Whiting Brothers complex.

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Route 66, Moriarty, New Mexico.

The neon rotosphere stands in front of what is now called the Breezy Rain Cafe, but is more known as the old El Comedor Restaurant. Dating back to 1953, the famed eatery is well known in New Mexico as a political launching pad, with visitors including several governors and even Presidents Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton.

The sign was installed in the 1960's and is the only one of its kind on Route 66. It was restored thanks to the Route 66 neon grant program in New Mexico.

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Route 66, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Now in a private collection, the Nob Hill Shoe Repair sign in Albuquerque appeared on Route 66 (Central Ave) in the 1980's, but he history of the business dates back many years before with the Martinez family. In fact, Candido Martinez opened his first family shoe repair business in Socorro, New Mexico in 1928. In 1960 he relocated to Albuquerque. In the meantime, his son Frank Martinez bought Nob Hill Shoe Repair in 1951, and moved it to Central Avenue in the early 80's. The shop closed around 2013 and the vintage neon sold to a private collector.

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Sire Bar & Grill, Riverside California.


Opening in 1955, the Sire Bar & Grill has been the quintessential neighborhood pub, serving ½ lb. signature burgers, lunch and dinner specials, cocktails and more.
Today, the Sire Bar and Grill has become become a City of Riverside landmark.
Under the same management as the day it opened.

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Guayo's Restaurant, Apache Trail (SR188), Globe Arizona.


In business since 1938.

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Sahuaro Motel, Tucson Arizona.


Not much is known about the history of this motel.
But there's a postcard out there of the motel from 1969, which at least dates it back to the early to mid 60's.
If anything, they taught people how to pronounce "saguaro".

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Elephant Car Wash, US Highway 60, 70 and 99, Rancho Mirage California.


An historical landmark in the Coachella Valley since 1966.

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Garcia's Cafe, Route 66, Albuquerque New Mexico.


Andrew Garcia began his culinary career as a traveling salesman. Later, he worked for the U.S. post office, where he became interested in entrepreneurism. He also had a love for food, so he began selling delicious, homemade food at state fairs.
With his family’s support, Garcia opened the first restaurant 1975.After 39 years, Garcia's has 8 locations throughout Albuquerque.
Andrew’s dream has been realized, and his enterprise employs almost 250 people. His simple wish was for people to be happy and eat good food. He has left a lasting legacy to Albuquerque and his family. Today his children run the business and keep his dream alive.

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Kismet Lodge, Desert Hot Springs California.


Now called the Living Waters Spa, this has been around since the 50's. The town is famous for all its natural hot springs.

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Carter Sexton Artist's Materials, North Hollywood California.


Carter Sexton Artist's Materials has been at the same location, 5308 Laurel Canyon Boulevard, since its opening in 1944. It was, and still is, a family owned business.

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Cupid's Burgers & Tacos, Corona California.


A landmark since the 70's.

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Santa Fe Motel, US Highway 466, Tehachapi California.
From the glory days of US Highway 466, around since the mid-50's.
Route 466 was one of the spurs of its more famous parent Route 66.

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Sans Souci Motel, Desert Shores California.

 

40 years ago the towns around the Salton Sea were booming resorts that threatened to rival Palm Springs just to the north.
Salton City was picked to be one of California’s major cities by the year 2000.
But once the year 2000 rolled around 3 decades later, the towns were long abandoned, and what remains is some of the bleakest, most desolate landscape in America. Everything about it spells disaster, defeat, abandonment.
At least from man’s perspective, because nature always wins, even if it isn’t always in the prettiest way.

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Roadside Americana: The Big Shoe, Shoe Repair, Bakersfield California.
No, the little old lady who lives in a shoe does not reside in Bakersfield. Built back in 1947, the giant shoe is one of at least three giant shoes in the United States.
Originally it was called Deschwanden's Shoe Repair Shop. It is thirty feet long, twenty feet high, and built of plaster on a wood frame.
The building also contains a fifty foot long rope as a shoelace.
The owner passed away in 1992, and in 2000, the shoe and the next door house were put up for sale.
The current store, conveniently also a shoe repair store named The Big Shoe, Shoe Repair, opened in 2003.

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Ed's Welding & Mfg Co, Los Angeles California.
From the 1960's and still operating.

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Bells & Vaughn, Pasadena California.
Frame and wheel aligning.
Because accidents happen...
Since 1946.

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Caruso's, Tucson Arizona.
Caruso's was started in the 1930s by Nicasio ("Caruso") Zagona, and the restaurant has remained in the family since then.

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Hi Fi Giraffe, Historic Filipinotown, Los Angeles California.
Sign of the former Big Top Deli from the 1950's.
The Screen Novelties Company bought the building in 2012 and saved the sign. They added the word Hi Fi to honor, and give back to, the community. They also gave the giraffe an X-rayed neck.

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El Cortez Hotel, Las Vegas Nevada, US highways 93, 95 and 466.
The El Cortez is a relatively small downtown Las Vegas gaming venue.
The official marketing slogan has been "Where locals come to play" since the El Cortez has traditionally attracted Las Vegas residents weary of large casinos geared towards tourists.
Slots, table games and a race and sports book occupy one floor of the main pavilion. It is one of the oldest casino-hotel properties in Las Vegas having continuously operated at the same Fremont Street location since 1941.
Primarily Spanish Colonial Revival in style, it reflects a 1952 remodel when the facade was modernized.
On February 22, 2013, the structure was placed on the National Register Of Historic Places.

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CW Services, Long Beach California.
For all your welding needs!
Since 1945.

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El Vado Motel, Albuquerque New Mexico, Route 66.
In anticipation of the realignment of Route 66 through Albuquerque, Daniel Murphy left his post as manager of the Franciscan Hotel in downtown Albuquerque to open the El Vado in 1937. Mr. Murphy, an Irishman who learned the hotel business in New York City before coming to New Mexico, constructed the El Vado Auto Court Motel along Central Avenue in Albuquerque near the Rio Grande and Old Town. He chose the motel’s name Vado, which means 'ford' in Spanish, for its location near the old ford that crossed the Rio Grande where Bridge Street is today.
The motel consists of 32 units, some of which are interspersed with covered carports, arranged in two parallel, one-story buildings facing a parking courtyard. When the motel opened, gas pumps were located along Central Avenue in front of the motel office on the northeast corner of the site. A flashy neon sign topped by an American Indian wearing a colorful headdress welcomes travelers on Route 66. Mr. Murphy constructed the motel in the Spanish Pueblo Revival style. Purposely-designed irregularities give the motel the look of the nearby Pueblos. These include curvilinear and straight parapets, irregular massing, varying buttresses, and exposed vigas (wooden roof beams). The interior of the motel office and lobby is ornately decorated in the Pueblo style. When the motel opened in 1937, the local business journal Albuquerque Progress described the units as “swanky tile cabin suites ready for the summer tourist trade.”
The El Vado retains a high degree of historic integrity, because it has been largely unaltered since its original construction. Route 66 historian David Kammer describes the motel as “one of the best examples of a largely unaltered pre-World War II tourist courts remaining along Route 66 in New Mexico.” Alterations include the removal of the gas pumps in front of the motel office, the addition of a swimming pool, the replacement of original windows with metal double-hung windows, and the painting of Southwest Indian designs on the façade. The El Vado’s relatively unaltered appearance coupled with its spatial arrangement, remaining carports, and use of Spanish Pueblo Revival style convey a strong sense of the property’s era. The El Vado is historically significant for its association with automobile tourism along Route 66; its role as an auto court in defining Albuquerque’s growth, appearance, and image; and its picturesque architectural style designed to attract tourism and immerse travelers in the exoticism and mystique of the Southwest. It was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1993.

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Zabriskie Point. Death Valley, California

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Hackberry, Arizona Route66

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Dante's view, Death Valley, California

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Top Star Motel, US Highway 40 (Colfax Avenue), Aurora Colorado.

Built in 1957, formally known as Bittner’s Top Star Motel and Star Motel.

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Middle Of Nowhere.


Nearest town: Chinle Arizona.

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Sue's Fish & Chips, Tucson Arizona.


Surrounded by restaurants serving gorditas and burritos on South Tucson’s Fourth Avenue is Sue’s Fish and Chips, a hidden gem that has been serving customers for 62 years.


Sue’s originated in a trailer on the corner of Fourth Avenue and 35th Street. It was 1952 and Sue’s was the first fast food restaurant in the area.

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Western Cabins, Manitou Springs Colorado.


Manitou Springs is famous for its cog railway to the top of Pikes Peak.


This sign and the cabins are from the early sixties.

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Thunderbird Liquors, Española New Mexico, US Highway 85.


Relatively new but wonderful sign.

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Las Chabelittas Sports Bar, Downey California.


Bar and sign from the sixties.

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The Mask, Upper Antelope Canyon, Page Arizona.

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Johnson Electric, Pueblo Colorado.


Johnson Electric was established in 1928 but the business moved here in 1944.


This sign might be from then or shortly after that.
The business is gone now but this sign remains.

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Army Surplus For Less, Englewood Colorado, US Highway 85.


In 1947, Al Finer returned to Denver after completing his military service during World War II in the Marine Corps. Al decided that he wanted to continue to be involved with military goods as he was during the war.


With $500, Al opened his first surplus store. While the products sold and the locations of the stores have changed over the years, Al's overall philosophy has always remained the same. "Give the customer the highest quality products and service for the lowest possible price."

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Parkway Cleaners, Denver Colorado.


The building has been a dry cleaners since sometime in the middle of last century. It was originally Martin's Dry Cleaners according to the sign still residing above the entrance.


The cool old hourglass neon sign advertising one hour cleaning is still there.

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Colt Motel & Restaurant sign.


Originally at the Y of US Highways 85, 87 and 64 in Raton New Mexico.


From the 50's.
Sign found in the yard of an antiques shop in Trinidad Colorado, just over the Raton Pass.

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Maverick Inn, US Highway 80, Yuma Arizona.


A honky tonk style bar from the 60's.

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Delicate Arch.


Arches National Park.


Moab, Arizona.

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Jim's Burger Haven, Thornton Colorado.


From the early 60's.

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 Cheese 'N Stuff Deli, Phoenix Arizona .

Serving downtown Phoenix for over 60 years.

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Ute Trading Post, Manitou Springs Colorado.

Originally the Ute Chief Trading Post curio shop, built in 1934 by the Ute Chief Mineral Water Company.

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Jensen's Recreation Center, Echo Park, Los Angeles California, Route 66.


A landmark from the 1920's on Sunset Boulevard.


Jensen’s Recreation Center was one of the first buildings in Los Angeles to feature a mix of residential and entertainment uses. It was declared a Los Angeles Historic Cultural Monument in 1998.
When completed in 1924, the building included a bowling alley and billiards parlor. The original 17-by-28-foot articulating incandescent sign that depicts a bowler throwing a strike remains on the roof.


Jensen’s Recreation Center is a neighborhood treasure in one of the trendiest pockets in Los Angeles.

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Johnny's Navajo Hogan, Colorado Springs Colorado, US Highway 85.


Owner Nicholas Fontecchio built the Navajo Hogan as a roadhouse in 1935.At that time, the only source for live entertainment was the Broadmoor Hotel.
Nicholas was convinced that the potential for a dance club/night club in Colorado Springs was enormous. Nicholas moved west as a labor organizer for the United Mine Workers to help organize the mine workers of Colorado. Nicholas spent considerable time with the Navajo Indians, many of whom were miners.
Hence, the Navajo Hogan Roadhouse was modeled and constructed after a Navajo Indian dwelling. The two large domes were constructed “without a single nail,” truly an engineering marvel.


Nicholas had a vision to provide a place for everyone from the region to gather along with the miners to interact together without affiliations, to meet as individuals and bond as friends and neighbors. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior in September of 1990.

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Balanced Rock.


Garden Of The Gods.
Colorado Springs, Colorado.

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Merle West Carpets, Whittier California.


Since 1934 Merle West has been serving Southern California with the best flooring rug and carpet cleaning prices.

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Tropics Motor Hotel, Indio California, US Highway 60, 70 and 99.
From the 1950's.

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Navajo Twins geologic formation, Bluff Utah, US Highway 191.

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Sun & Sea Motel, Desert Shores California, Salton Sea, US Highway 99.


40 years ago the towns around the Salton Sea were booming resorts that threatened to rival Palm Springs just to the north. Salton City was picked to be one of California’s major cities by the year 2000.

But once the year 2000 rolled around 3 decades later, the towns were long abandoned, and what remains is some of the bleakest, most desolate landscape in America. Everything about it spells disaster, defeat, abandonment, at least from man’s perspective, because nature always wins, even if it isn’t always in the prettiest way.

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Sangre De Cristo Motel, Questa New Mexico.


From the 1950's

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Hong Kong Restaurant, Phoenix Arizona.


Renamed the New Hong Kong Restaurant but other than that nothing much has changed here since the 1960's.

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Petrified Forest National Park.


Holbrook Arizona.

Popular and beautiful tourist attraction, once along the original Route 66.

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Richardson Cash Pawn, Gallup New Mexico, Route 66.


Established in 1913.

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Spider Rock. Canyon De Chelley. Chinle Arizona.


Spider Rock stands with awesome dignity and beauty over 800 feet high in Arizona's colourful Canyon de Chelly National Park (pronounced Da Shay). Geologists of the National Park Service say that "the formation began 230 million years ago.


Windblown sand swirled and compressed with time created the spectacular red sandstone monolith. Long ago, the Dine (Navajo) Indian tribe named it Spider Rock.

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Pomona Fish Market, Pomona California.

The Fish Market has been in Pomona for decades.
On a microfilm at the local library an ad from April 1st 1937 was found for the market, meaning it’s at least 70 years old.

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